Catherine Reynolds

Dr. Catherine Reynolds
Senior Researcher

Catherine Reynolds studied History at Oxford University and History of Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London; her Ph.D thesis was on Parisian manuscript illumination in the mid-15th century. After being a Lecturer in the History of Art in Reading and then London University, she became an independent scholar, teaching and lecturing for various institutions, including the Victoria and Albert Museum. She is a Consultant on Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts for Christie’s, London. In 2003 she was a Visiting Scholar in the Manuscript Department of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. Her research is focussed on painting and manuscript illumination in the Netherlands and France from the late 14th to the mid-16th century.

Catherine Reynolds has worked with Illuminare on the colloquium associated with the exhibition Rogier van der Weyden, Master of Passions in 2009 and co-edited the publication of the papers; in 2010 she was a member of the Scientific Committee for the The Anjou Bible: Naples 1340, a Royal Manuscript Revealed ; in 2013 the research done with Lieve Watteeuw on the illuminated manuscripts in the Museum Plantin-Moretus was published and presented in an exhibition at the Museum.

Her publications include contributions to the exhibition catalogues ‘Illuminators and the Painters’ Guilds’, pp. 14-33 in Thomas Kren and Scot McKendrick, Illuminating the Renaissance, the Triumph of Flemish Manuscript Painting in Europe 1467-1561, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and the Royal Academy, London, 2003; ‘England and the Continent: Artistic Relations’, pp.76-85 in Gothic. Art for England 1400-1547, Richard Marks and Paul Williamson eds, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2003; ‘Patinir and Depictions of Landscape in the Netherlands’, Patinir, Alejandro Vergara ed., Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, 2007, pp.96-115. She has contributed to various collections of essays, conference papers and periodicals, including The Burlington Magazine and Revue de l’Art.